Why you should include video in your next marketing plan

Video is no longer an “up-and-coming” marketing tactic — it’s here, and it’s a powerful way to communicate.

To start, here are three Insivia statistics that suggest why you should consider using video in your marketing campaigns:

  1. 1/3 of all online activity is spent watching video
  2. 92% of mobile video consumers share videos with others
  3. 87% of online marketers use video content

Live video

If you don’t want to invest in professionally filmed and edited videos, have you thought about trying live video to see if that works for your brand?

The key to the success of live streaming is its accessibility and unpredictability. It’s not staged or an advert; it’s a genuine experience. The things you see are actually happening, creating a transparent representation – QS Digital Solutions

While there are live streaming video services available from Twitter (Periscope) and YouTube, Facebook – with its 1.86billion active users – would be the place I’d start. You’ll get instant feedback on whether people like what you’re doing through likes, shares and comments.facebook-live-video

If you’re worried about your video looking less ‘authentic’ and more ‘amateur’, for around a £100 investment you can buy some basic tools such as a clip on mic and small tripod to improve the sound and picture quality, without compromising the authenticity of the film.

360-degree video

For something completely different, you could consider 360-degree video.

Incorporating 360-degree technology further immerses users in your world, creating a new layer of connectedness or giving them an ‘on the ground’ view that they might have been missing previously.

Ted Baker recently invested in a new 360-degree ‘shoppable film’ to increase shopper engagement and drive online purchases:

 

Ted Baker 360 video

A still from Ted Baker’s 360-degree ‘shoppable film’

 

Google suggests that 360-degree video typically results in a higher click through rate, as well as a greater amount of engagement in the form of social shares. 360 video can have a 3x times higher average watch time, too, (source: iProspect) and while this is all very persuasive, it is worth bearing in mind that virtual reality development can add approximately 40% of additional costs to video production.

So, will you be including video in your next marketing plan?

 

Video: The value of PR as part of your comms strategy

I was recently asked to talk to a group of school marketing and admissions colleagues about why PR should form part of their communications strategies.

Here are a couple of short clips on the value of PR as part of a wider strategy and how to identify a potential story. Enjoy!

Why should you do PR? from Rebecca Hills on Vimeo.

Three elements of a good PR story from Rebecca Hills on Vimeo.

The art of great content

I’m always on the lookout for great webinars and courses to continue my professional development so I was delighted when I spotted a tweet from Socialbakers about a free lunchtime webinar on The art of great content.Jonah book

Based primarily on concepts from the book Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger, here are my key takeaways for creating truly great social content:

1. Social currency

“You are what you share”. Focus on producing content that makes people look good when they share it.

Good examples of this are:

  • Behind the scenes photos and info – make followers feel like insiders
  • Put your fans in the spotlight – crowdsource content from your community. Engage with the user before you repost it to find out the story behind the image or video so that you can share that too and get even more engagement. This is a good example from GoPro who post a fan photo every day:

GoPRo2

2. Trigger

Celebrate events that are happening right now (you can use a content calendar to look ahead and plan your activity) but be part of it, rather than trying to make it all about you.

There are some great examples of brands doing just this at events like the Golden Globe Awards (L’Oréal) and World Cup (Orange).

Focus on your brand values not your brand products. Invite people to join the conversation with you.

3. Emotion

When we care, we share.

“Emotion is one factor that drives sharing. We see lots of funny stuff go viral on YouTube, but we also see angry political rants get shared,” Berger says. “Any emotion that fires us up–humor, awe and excitement, but also anger and anxiety–drives us to share.” – Jonah Berger

4. Public

Recognise the power of social influencers to spread your message.

How do you find those influencers?

  • Use social listening tools to monitor for keywords relevant to your brand or campaign
  • Identify the most active and the most engaging content creators for those keywords
  • Ensure their style and their values align with yours

social influencer

5. Practical value

Think about how you can be valuable to your fans. Package knowledge and expertise in your content so people can easily pass it along.

A good example is a supermarket (e.g. Lidl) sharing video recipes with its fans:

Lidl

6. Story

I’m a big believer in the value of storytelling in marketing communications. If you don’t believe me, check out this blog post on Storytelling: corporate buzzword or clever business?

When creating story-based content for social media, the key is to embed your brand into the plot so people cannot tell your story without mentioning your brand.

A good example of this comes from Adidas who told the story of the World Cup in Brazil from the ball’s perspective:

Brazuca 1Brazuca 2