Is short notice ever too short notice in the world of PR?

Most PR professionals will tell you that when a national newspaper, A-list trade magazine or influential blogger calls with a PR opportunity, they’ll do just about anything to make it work.

Journalists work to notoriously tight deadlines and these frequently get passed on to the PR people whose clients they want/need for an interview, quote or information.

Image source: faqs.org

When an opportunity for such good coverage is presented, tight turnaround times are rarely too tight – and they’re accepted as an everyday part of the PR role. In fact, if a journalist doesn’t want something tomorrow, in the next hour or right away, it tends to be an unexpected (but very welcome) surprise.

Of course it’s not always the case. Monthly magazines plan months in advance and comprehensive forward feature tracking can negate many last-minute panics. But when it comes to being part of a breaking news story, a quick turnaround is crucial to securing the best coverage, with the freshest angle.

“If you can’t handle the heat, get out of the kitchen” – You need to be able to react instantaneously, gather your facts (and spokespeople) in record time and provide something significantly different to the rest of the PR pack if you’re going to get the results that you need, in the titles that you want.

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One thought on “Is short notice ever too short notice in the world of PR?

  1. All great points. It’s also vital to have high res meda ready pictures on file of all spokespeople to offer the journalist when they call. The picture could be the difference between your client’s quote being used or not.

    I recognise not all PRs are that organised as I’ve lost count of the number of times we have had a call from a PR for us to go immediately and shoot one of their clients and send the results to a national paper for publication the next day.

    Better to be in control and get the pix done in advance though where you will have far more control.

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